Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2009

I was recently listening to Mårten Mickos, in an event sponsored by SWOT Consulting.

Mårten gave an excellent presentation with the idea of “How would I build a global software company right now”. He almost immediately pointed out that it does not make sense to say “Finnish Global Software Company” as that would already be against the definition. It can of course be that it is initiated by the Finns. As his success and experience from MySQL is well known, it makes sense to pay attention to what he says.

There are both challenges and opportunities (accessible with specific strengths) in this field.

He listed the following challenges anyone building a software company (in Finland) will face:

  1. Finland is too small and too expensive. This can be overcome by either focusing or going into volumes.
  2. Finland is good in utilizing software, not so good in producing it globally.
  3. We are slow.
  4. The Finns believe too much in institutions. More sales work, less filling in forms for subsidies and grants.
  5. There is room for improvement concerning the will to really fight (to become successful). In some respects, life is too easy for many. True winners are those who learn to fight for the success!
  6. We believe (still) that we are a leading edge country (“We come from Finland, country of Nokia”). More humble approach would be good as well as partnering with foreign complementary people.

The Finns have many strengths, however, which could and should be utilized better:

  1. The working moral is good, better than in USA/Silicon Valley as is the management style.
  2. The quality of work is good, honestly. Even when nobody is watching!
  3. Well-functioning society, everything works. (Author’s comment: not without briberies some statistics show, it’s just different)
  4. Mad creativity in development, making Finns suitable for all kind of pioneer development.

Utilizing the strengths and becoming successful also requires:

  1. Being in the right time, in the right place. You also need luck!
  2. Going into one of the large markets (EU, USA or China) quickly.

Mårten also gave his view on the software market status as of now:

  • Consolidation is taking place. You have to either find a pioneer market or find a niche in the consolidating segments.
  • Convergence means there are no borders between web and mobile, one must be capable to operate in both.
  • Increasing complexity – select your target market with care.
  • Global growth – do your market research concerning the existing players with care.
  • Market domination game requires you to find weak point of the market leader and take advantage of that.
  • Utilize the Open Source opportunities.
  • Everything is in the Net, and so will you.

Mårten summarized all this by saying that one must be brave but humble, ready to conquer the world BUT aiming at carefully selected market segments and geographical locations with carefully selected go-to-market-plan.

There are, in my humble opinion, many good points in his presentation. There’s is always something to learn!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I was recently listening to Mårten Mickos, in an event sponsored by SWOT Consulting.

Mårten gave an excellent presentation with the idea of “How would I build a global software company right now”. He almost immediately pointed out that it does not make sense to say “Finnish Global Software Company” as that would already be against the definition. It can of course be that it is initiated by the Finns. As his success and experience from MySQL is well known, it makes sense to pay attention to what he says.

There are both challenges and opportunities (accessible with specific strengths) in this field.

He listed the following challenges anyone building a software company (in Finland) will face:

  1. Finland is too small and too expensive. This can be overcome by either focusing or going into volumes.
  2. Finland is good in utilizing software, not so good in producing it globally.
  3. We are slow.
  4. The Finns believe too much in institutions. More sales work, less filling in forms for subsidies and grants.
  5. There is room for improvement concerning the will to really fight (to become successful). In some respects, life is too easy for many. True winners are those who learn to fight for the success!
  6. We believe (still) that we are a leading edge country (“We come from Finland, country of Nokia”). More humble approach would be good as well as partnering with foreign complementary people.

The Finns have many strengths, however, which could and should be utilized better:

  1. The working moral is good, better than in USA/Silicon Valley as is the management style.
  2. The quality of work is good, honestly. Even when nobody is watching!
  3. Well-functioning society, everything works. (Author’s comment: not without briberies some statistics show, it’s just different)
  4. Mad creativity in development, making Finns suitable for all kind of pioneer development.

Utilizing the strengths and becoming successful also requires:

  1. Being in the right time, in the right place. You also need luck!
  2. Going into one of the large markets (EU, USA or China) quickly.

Mårten also gave his view on the software market status as of now:

  • Consolidation is taking place. You have to either find a pioneer market or find a niche in the consolidating segments.
  • Convergence means there are no borders between web and mobile, one must be capable to operate in both.
  • Increasing complexity – select your target market with care.
  • Global growth – do your market research concerning the existing players with care.
  • Market domination game requires you to find weak point of the market leader and take advantage of that.
  • Utilize the Open Source opportunities.
  • Everything is in the Net, and so will you.

Mårten summarized all this by saying that one must be brave but humble, ready to conquer the world BUT aiming at carefully selected market segments and geographical locations with carefully selected go-to-market-plan.

There are, in my humble opinion, many good points in his presentation. There’s is always something to learn!

Read Full Post »

Build Your Own Dream Team

Build Your Own Dream Team

Last week I blogged about comparing the movie industry and the software industry. The feedback given in the comments and in real world quite rightly focused on the two actual problems (and areas to learn from): defining what the “production” should be and how to get a team to implement it.

The question last week was “So what can we learn about this concerning the software industry?”

First of all, it’s not that easy (of course not!). But as we have to start somewhere, let’s shoot this out.

  1. Lesson Number One is to implement processes and methods to ensure that the customer need is understood. Communication is the key, especially as it might be (as it is) that the customer does not know what she wants in the first place. And that changes anyway. The concept of “shared unified understanding” is quite important, as well as how to achieve and maintain it.
  2. Lesson Number Two is that each project (“production”) may be different. So you may need different skills each time. No company can successfully employ all the possible skills on payroll and function effectively. The Dream Team is different each time. Would like to watch a war movie, a love movie and a documentary done with the same actors, same person acting as a war hero and the most lovable lady? Most likely not.
  3. Lesson Number Three is the Crew Commitment. Even if you have the best possible definition of the project, and the best doers available, you can fail if the team does not commit themselves to this production. You need all the help from each team member in order to find and manage all the issues that there will be. It is impossible to micro manage all this (even though it may have been possible in the factories last century). To a certain extent being afraid of failure would help to get better results. Social (group) pressure to get things done properly in order to avoid consequence (whatever they are) could help here?

So what can we (as software industry) learn from the movie industry…?

Beside the above mentioned issues, re-engineer your thinking. The future is not in the big software companies, it’s in the networked ecosystem of best doers of each field. There is certainly work to be done in the way we make sure “what you get is what you wanted” but also on the field of setting up the dream team for each production. And managing network of experts (maybe globally) calls for different kind of managing talents than the traditional models. You need to get the Crew Commitment in place. It’s just the question of time when this will be done by somebody!

But what about marketing? Is it any importance in the software industry (like it is in the movie industry)? Of course. It’s easy if you’ve got a customer who came to you and buys a custom project from you (even in that case it’s the question how they found you). But if you are a startup, what can you learn from movie marketing in this field. Comments, knowledge and best practices are welcome – we’ll discuss this next.

Read Full Post »