Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Hollywood’

Build Your Own Dream Team

Build Your Own Dream Team

Last week I blogged about comparing the movie industry and the software industry. The feedback given in the comments and in real world quite rightly focused on the two actual problems (and areas to learn from): defining what the “production” should be and how to get a team to implement it.

The question last week was “So what can we learn about this concerning the software industry?”

First of all, it’s not that easy (of course not!). But as we have to start somewhere, let’s shoot this out.

  1. Lesson Number One is to implement processes and methods to ensure that the customer need is understood. Communication is the key, especially as it might be (as it is) that the customer does not know what she wants in the first place. And that changes anyway. The concept of “shared unified understanding” is quite important, as well as how to achieve and maintain it.
  2. Lesson Number Two is that each project (“production”) may be different. So you may need different skills each time. No company can successfully employ all the possible skills on payroll and function effectively. The Dream Team is different each time. Would like to watch a war movie, a love movie and a documentary done with the same actors, same person acting as a war hero and the most lovable lady? Most likely not.
  3. Lesson Number Three is the Crew Commitment. Even if you have the best possible definition of the project, and the best doers available, you can fail if the team does not commit themselves to this production. You need all the help from each team member in order to find and manage all the issues that there will be. It is impossible to micro manage all this (even though it may have been possible in the factories last century). To a certain extent being afraid of failure would help to get better results. Social (group) pressure to get things done properly in order to avoid consequence (whatever they are) could help here?

So what can we (as software industry) learn from the movie industry…?

Beside the above mentioned issues, re-engineer your thinking. The future is not in the big software companies, it’s in the networked ecosystem of best doers of each field. There is certainly work to be done in the way we make sure “what you get is what you wanted” but also on the field of setting up the dream team for each production. And managing network of experts (maybe globally) calls for different kind of managing talents than the traditional models. You need to get the Crew Commitment in place. It’s just the question of time when this will be done by somebody!

But what about marketing? Is it any importance in the software industry (like it is in the movie industry)? Of course. It’s easy if you’ve got a customer who came to you and buys a custom project from you (even in that case it’s the question how they found you). But if you are a startup, what can you learn from movie marketing in this field. Comments, knowledge and best practices are welcome – we’ll discuss this next.

Read Full Post »

I don’t actually know a lot about about the Hollywood movie business. Well, I’ve seen quite many, I’ve been to Hollywood, I know few people in the business and I’ve read about creating movies. Still I thought I’ve learned few things that keep me wondering the possible similarities between two things: 1) Creating and publishing a successful movie (“a hit”) and 2) Creating and publishing a successful web site (“a hit”).

Here’s what I had in mind. Both need a script how it should go, both need a good team to get it implemented and both need somebody to pay the cost initially and success of both is measured by usage volume.

The terms we use are of course different. In software business we have a “business plan”, that’s our script. We have our team, preferably a dream team which are known as actors in the movie business. I think both get money from something we call “investors”. Measuring the success, however, is not a matter of the few first days only in software business, right? The first impression does matter, however.

Both businesses are “hit driven”. Most cases fail, and investors make money with the ones that succeed. And most importantly those who write good script become famous and/or rich not to mention the best actors who are well known and wanted to the next potential big hits.

So why don’t we do the following in order to create successful net stories:

  1. Create an environment or ecosystem where entrepreneurs can create those stories such a way that potential investors can be convinced to fund it even before you have the dream team in place. One question is that does the script writer also need to be the director (ie. business plan writer/concept owner need to be the CEO)?
  2. Include in the above mentioned ecosystem a mechanism to build your own dream team (with the money from the investors) to implement this project (which has a deadline, release date and so on). The best people should get their compensation which should be high enough to let them focus on several interesting projects without being stuck to a single project for 10 years.
  3. Run the implementation such a way that it is controlled, you have a flexible way of changing the “actors” if they do not deliver and the good ones get the credit.
  4. Release the mov.. service and switch to maintenance mode (or to development of Episode #2).

I think I could make my my living pretty good by writing those scripts and publishing those within a working ecosystem like this. At least dreaming about that kind of possibility keeps me awake.

So what would be the top ten reasons why it would not work and what do we need to do in order to fix those?

Read Full Post »

I don’t actually know a lot about about the Hollywood movie business. Well, I’ve seen quite many, I’ve been to Hollywood, I know few people in the business and I’ve read about creating movies. Still I thought I’ve learned few things that keep me wondering the possible similarities between two things: 1) Creating and publishing a successful movie (“a hit”) and 2) Creating and publishing a successful web site (“a hit”).

Here’s what I had in mind. Both need a script how it should go, both need a good team to get it implemented and both need somebody to pay the cost initially and success of both is measured by usage volume.

The terms we use are of course different. In software business we have a “business plan”, that’s our script. We have our team, preferably a dream team which are known as actors in the movie business. I think both get money from something we call “investors”. Measuring the success, however, is not a matter of the few first days only in software business, right? The first impression does matter, however.

Both businesses are “hit driven”. Most cases fail, and investors make money with the ones that succeed. And most importantly those who write good script become famous and/or rich not to mention the best actors who are well known and wanted to the next potential big hits.

So why don’t we do the following in order to create successful net stories:

  1. Create an environment or ecosystem where entrepreneurs can create those stories such a way that potential investors can be convinced to fund it even before you have the dream team in place. One question is that does the script writer also need to be the director (ie. business plan writer/concept owner need to be the CEO)?
  2. Include in the above mentioned ecosystem a mechanism to build your own dream team (with the money from the investors) to implement this project (which has a deadline, release date and so on). The best people should get their compensation which should be high enough to let them focus on several interesting projects without being stuck to a single project for 10 years.
  3. Run the implementation such a way that it is controlled, you have a flexible way of changing the “actors” if they do not deliver and the good ones get the credit.
  4. Release the mov.. service and switch to maintenance mode (or to development of Episode #2).

I think I could make my my living pretty good by writing those scripts and publishing those within a working ecosystem like this. At least dreaming about that kind of possibility keeps me awake.

So what would be the top ten reasons why it would not work and what do we need to do in order to fix those?

Read Full Post »